Category Archives: More Misadventures!

My misadventures in the world of comedy.

How to Be a Good Comedy Audience

Inspired by an article on Hip in Detroit about how to be a good music fan, I decided to write about what it takes to be a good comedy audience.

1. Research the comedian you’re going to see.  There are a crazy number of a varieties of comedy.  It’s like ice cream.  Baskin Robbins sells 31 flavors because not everybody likes chocolate or vanilla.  Some people love Superman…and if you’re one of those people, you’re wrong!  Comedy is the same way.  Maybe you like the nimble wordplay of a Myq Kaplan or the introspection of a Marc Maron or maybe you just like an angry hippy to smash a watermelon on stage.  Those are just three examples of the many, many kinds of comedy out there.  All are valid.  Comedy clubs generally only serve one kind of ice cream each week.  I love Moose Tracks.  I’d hate to go to a comedy club expecting Moose Tracks and find out that week they were only serving Raspberry Sherbet.  I hate Rasperries!  So research your entertainment options.  Most comedy clubs have a website where they list the performers.  And most performers have clips of their act available online.  I wouldn’t walk into a movie house and just plan on seeing “movie”.  No, I’d know exactly what movie I wanted to see because I researched the product  first.  I should have stuck with the ice cream analogy.  I’m hungry. Read the rest of this entry

Comedy Pro Tip: The Tortoise and the Hare.

Maybe it’s nerves or the adrenaline rush of doing what we’ve waited all day long to do, but many comedians tend to talk a bit too fast on stage.  Comedian and owner of the Komedy Korner, Leo DuFour once suggested when I got off stage that I slow down and enjoy my time like I would a delicious meal.   Maybe that was a health tip and I’m forgetting that I was scarfing down a Poutine platter at the time….it was Canada after all.   Let me find another example.

One of my best friends asked me after a show why I don’t speak on stage like I speak normally off stage.  He was right.  I didn’t believe in my material at the time so on stage I would yell and ram my jokes down the throats of the audience as quickly as I could.

Read the rest of this entry

Lessons Learned: Comedy Club on State

Last week I was at one of my favorite clubs, The Comedy Club on State in Madison, Wisconsin.  I absolutely love this place.  Gus and Mary who own it are two of the nicest people I’ve ever had the good fortune of meeting.  Their daughters Eve and Anna are beautiful inside and out.  Joe, the room manager runs are super tight ship and is an hell of a guy too.  The waitstaff is stunning.  The bartenders all handsome.  Both on the surface and beneath it, everything about this place is fantastic.

Originally I was supposed to be doing this week as a split week where I would headline Thursday and then Eddie Brill who used to book Letterman would come in on Friday and Saturday.  Eddie got into a little trouble earlier this year for being misquoted or having his words taken out of context about female comics.  So he canceled the gig.  Instead I was working with Ian Edwards. Read the rest of this entry

Week in Review: West Coast to the Midwest

This past weekend I was at the Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase with my friend Nate Fridson.  I’ve only seen Nate once since he moved to New York about a year or so ago.  He churned out a ton of new material.  It was really nice watching him.  I was nervous going into the weekend since it had been a good month since I did more than 15 minutes of time in one set.   Maybe stand up is like riding a bike.  I haven’t ridden a bike in years and I’m worried how my first attempt would be.

The shows ended up going pretty well.  With the exception of about four or five minutes on being an uncle, I’m not doing any material from my CD that I released just about a year ago.   I have a pretty good track record at the Showcase so I took advantage of that trust to try out some new pieces.   Most of them worked.

This week marks the start of two months of road work.  The boredom I feel from doing the same jokes over and over again tends to go away when I’m in new cities.   I know everything will be brand new to them.  This week I’ll be at the Skyline Comedy Cafe in Appleton, Wisconsin.  It’s a great club and I’m really looking forward to it.

Earlier in the week I did a live episode of WTF with Marc Maron.  That was pretty awesome.  I know Marc has his reputation, but he’s been super cool to me.  I was nervous for the interview, but it went fairly well.  We dug a little more into my personal life than I would have wanted, but that’s the nature of the show.  After that I went over to the UCB Theatre and did a set on Comedy Bang Bang.  Zach Galifianakis closed that show.  Backstage he seemed like a genuinely good guy.  That made me happy.  Eric Andre was there too.  He was just super nice and charming.  It really does seem like the only dicks you encounter in this business are the people at the bottom who are bitter being stuck there.  The higher up you go, the nicer people seem to be.

I closed out my LA trip with a set on The Meltdown and Meltdown Comics.  That show was simply amazing.  It’s a small room, packed full of comedy super fans.  The line up is always great.  I was so honored that my Jonah Ray let me be part of it.  Through my years I’ve met a lot of people who I don’t get to see nearly as much as I’d like.  Jonah is one of those guys.  He’s another guy who in addition to being a really good comedian, is also a hell of a nice person.

Sean Patton from New Orleans closed the Meltdown show and was simply amazing.  I worked with Sean here in Michigan and thought he was great.  Earlier this week though, that greatness was on a whole new level.  At the risk of sounding like a broken record, another super awesome person too.  Hopefully Sean and I will be able to do some shows together in 2013.  He’s going to be on Maron’s television show for IFC next year.  I have a feeling that’s about the time that he’s going to blow up and become a household name at least with comedy nerds.

From start to finish, last week was a blast!  Enjoy some clips from Nate, Jonah and Sean.

Tales From The Script: Part 6 (Here Goes Nothing…literally)

Through comedy I know a few people.  Through her work, Lesley knows a few people as well.  In my mind, here’s basically how I thought this would work.

Lesley and I wrote a really good screenplay.  We let some people read it and give us feedback.  We wrote a better second draft.  We had some funny people over to read through it and we took notes on the comedy beats and how the words flowed.  We wrote an even better third draft.  We registered the script with the WGA.  Then we started contacting people.

Our script is basically Bridesmaids meets The Social Network.   It’s really funny.  Paul Feig, the director of Bridesmaids, was a stand up comedian in Detroit, just like me.  A mutual friend gave me his e-mail address a long time ago and we wrote back and forth a couple times.  He was super nice and supportive.  So, with this third draft in hand, I wrote him and asked him if he could point me towards someone who could read it.  I know there are all sorts of legal issues with asking him to read it himself.  I waited for a response.  And waited.  And waited.  And waited.

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been in LA to do some comedy stuff.  I always had a couple thumb drives in my pocket with copies of the script in case I ran into someone that could do something with it.  I ended up performing on Comedy Bang Bang at the UCB Theater.  It’s a show produced by the great Scott Aukerman, who in addition to creating Comedy Bang Bang, has been making a living as a writer since about 1994.   I got to pick his brain for a little bit after the show.

He told me that a response from Paul would be a long shot because even though I worded my e-mail carefully, the potential for lawsuits would be too risky.  Even if he did write back, it was unlikely that he’d feel comfortable passing on a thing he hasn’t read himself.  Yeah, that’s a big Catch 22.  He can’t read it because of legal issues.  He can’t pass it on because it’s good because he can’t read it.  Scott said the way to get it out there is to basically treat the script like I treat my stand up and let the work speak for itself.  I need to let people in Hollywood read it and generate a buzz.  Eventually the buzz will get around and someone will take interest.   There’s a part in the script that would be perfect for TJ Miller.  I know him a little, so maybe I’ll try to get it in his hands.

The more likely scenario Scott said was that someone will notice me from my stand up and want to be my agent.  They’ll ask if I have a script and when I tell them about this thing that Lesley and I created, it’ll make me 20 times more valuable.   Great.  Well, as good as I feel I am as a stand up, no one in nine and a half years has asked to be my agent yet.

Discouraging?  Yeah.  A long time ago and older comedian asked to take me out to lunch so he could pick my brain.  He was retired now and wanted to make a run of it as a comedian.  He was a nice guy who had been public speaking for longer than I’ve been alive.  He was comfortable on stage, but every joke he told came straight from a book.  I told him that the only way he could make a go of it as a comedian was to write his own material.  He didn’t want to hear that and got angry.  I couldn’t tell him what he wanted to hear.  I told him what he needed to hear.  Scott Aukerman didn’t tell me what I wanted to hear.  There is no secret backdoor into the writing pool of Hollywood.  He told me what I needed to hear.  There is no secret backdoor into the writing pool of Hollywood.

So where does that leave us?  Lesley has a couple connections too, but they feel like really long shots.  To make the script speak for itself, I think the plan is to do what I would do with my comedy.  For comedy, a lot of people enter festivals so our peers from all over take notice of us and hopefully spread the word.  I think Lesley and I are going to start entering the script into different script writing contests and see what happens.  Maybe it isn’t as good as we think it is.  I really like it.  When I pitch it to people, they seem to like it.  They laugh.  If there’s one thing I’ve learned in nine and a half years in comedy it’s the difference between a kind and a genuine laugh.  I think they laugh genuinely.

So that’s it for now.  You’re up to speed.  I’ll let you know when something happens.  If something happens.

Tales From the Script: Part 5 (Voices Carry)

When Lesley and I initially started writing our script, we were writing it with the intent to find a local production company to shoot it for us with us in the leads.  Once we changed our minds on that, we dream cast it so that we’d both be writing towards the same vision.

I know a lot of writers say they don’t do this, but it helped me a lot.   Like with writing jokes, most of it happens for me while I’m lying in bed at night unable to sleep.  I’ll just lay there with ideas racing through my head until I have to jump up and find a notebook.  Sometimes ideas hit me first thing in the morning, which honestly, beating the alarm to jump out of bed with some creative inspiration is a great way to start the day!

Writing with someone in mind helped me find the character’s voice fairly easily.  Final Draft has a profile on Facebook where every day they have some sort of writing tip or question.  Recently they posed a question asking if you were to block out the names of the characters in your script, would you still be able to tell who they are?

Once we hammered out our first draft, we assigned each other characters and we went through the script focusing on each piece of those lines trying to make sure there was a flow.    One thing that came from this that I liked was I had one of the characters often times refer to another by a nickname.  I think this was a nice little touch to show that they had some sort of history.   The unfortunately short lived television show The Middle Man did this too.  The lead was named Wendy Watson.  Her partner called her Dub Dub.   A little touch like that was nice because it not only showed a little bit of familiarity, but it was so out of character for the straight laced Middle Man to use a nickname that it really humanized him.  It gave his character a little more depth.

Another thing Lesley and I did that helped was we had our friends over to read through the script assigning them different roles.  Some lines didn’t flow as smoothly out of other mouths, so as we did the readthru I took notes on how the actor initially wanted to read a line.

I tend to flip sentences.  Not like Yoda, but a little bit like that.  Right now, I’m totally blanking on an example.  Hmm.  I guess that was an example in itself.  Where a lot of people may have said “I’m totally blanking on an example right now.”  I lead with the “right now”.   I think I’m better at that now.   A long time ago a friend asked me where I originally hail from because he found my sentence structure so foreign.

So there you go.  That’s a little insight in our process in trying to give our characters unique voices.  Does anyone else have any tips?

Tales From the Script: Part 4 (The Book is better…)

I mentioned before that Final Draft is the most important tool and screenwriter can use.  Another, almost as important, tool is this great book called Writing Movies for Fun and Profit.

I’ve read a lot…a few…books on writing scripts.  This one by far is my favorite.  It’s written by Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon who are most visibly known for Reno 911.  What you may not know is that they’ve also written pretty much ever third comedy made since 2000.  They don’t write giant award winning masterpieces, but they do write extremely marketable and successful comedies like the Night at the Museum movies and Herbie Fully Loaded.  They’ve also done a literal shit ton of punch ups on movies they’re not credited for.

In their book, Ben and Thomas take you through every step of the career as a screenwriter.  They go in depth about the different kinds of writing jobs you can get and really dive into the business side of writing.  It’s also a really practical writing guide too.   They cover everything form pitching your script to dealing with the Hollywood powers that be once it’s in development.

It’s a really quick and light read that’s full of humor and really great information.  I can’t recommend this book enough.  In fact, if you’re a screen writer and you don’t own this….then you’re probably and asshole.

I’m in LA right now as you’re reading this.  Unless of course you’re reading this sometime other than August 2012.  Chapter 22 will tell me what I need to know now that I’m here.   Okay, I’m not supposed to write in public because everyone will assume I’m a douchebag.   Okay, there’s a list of all the In-N-Out Burger locations as well as a guide to their secret menu. I’m going to grab a bite to eat and go write in private.

Leaving Las Vegas (Not Soon Enough) or Viva LaBove!

I’m in Vegas right now.  Even though I’m writing this on Sunday, the 12th, I can assure you I’m not having a good time.  I’ve only had a good time once in Vegas and that was when I was trying not to cry in the hotel room of a man I met earlier that month.

During the day I work part-time doing marketing for an entertainment company.  I don’t know how much I’m allowed to say, so I’ll leave it at that.  Every year we have our conference in Vegas.  I don’t generally enjoy it.  Yeah, the conference itself is fine.  It does what it’s supposed to.  It gets you pumped up for the coming busy season.  It’s also great to see in person the people who also work for the company across the country.  There are a handful that I have a lot in common with so it’s nice to see them outside of Facebook.  I don’t gamble, so Vegas holds no appeal for me there.  I generally don’t party either.  Although last year a ton of little things piled on top of each other and just caused me so much stress and anger that I ended up drinking way too much Scotch, much to the dismay of the guy with whom I was sharing a room.  I coated the bathroom from both ends.

I’ve been to Vegas to perform at Trooperfest, the first Star Wars convention specifically for the 501st.  I got to hang out with all sorts of nice and wonderful people.  Every time something cool happened, I felt like I was verbally and emotionally punched in the face when I wanted to share that with the person I was closest to at the time.  It was years ago, but my overall memory that festival wasn’t a happy one.

Last year I was in Vegas for the World Series of Comedy.  Again, trouble in my personal life kept me from enjoying this potentially awesome networking opportunity.  My head wasn’t in the game and I was out in the first round.  I remember getting ready to go out on stage and just deciding to wing it and riff with the crowd even though everyone in that situation should know that the last thing a judge wants to see is how well you do crowd work.  Yeah?  Well, my crowd work is right up there with the masters like Pardo and Iott.  Mike…you idiot!  I got off stage and Eric Yoder from Funny Business just gave me a look like, “What the hell was that?”  Technically, I was doing my Bear Calendar joke, which isn’t really crowd work.  It’s my magic trick.  It’s a slight of hand.  It looks like crowd work, but it’s mostly scripted….or at the very least flow charted.

So, I was in Vegas after having crapped out in the first round of The World Series of Comedy and I still had a couple nights left until my return flight.  Earlier that month I worked with Carl LaBove in Grand Rapids at Dr. Grin’s.  Words can not explain how great I think Carl is.  He’s like Yoda and the Dude from Big Lebowski rolled up into one.  He’s wise and care free.  He’s a master story teller…and what’s great about his stories is that after you’ve enjoyed them and you’ve had time to reflect, you see that his story that he picked to tell you at that moment was serving a point.

Early the second morning of the World Series of Comedy, I was sitting in the hotel lobby trying to decide if I wanted to walk to the casino where Carl and I were to meet for lunch or if I wanted to take a cab.  I was trying to use Google map on my phone, but Vegas is deceptively large.  Comedian Brad Tassell stopped in and we started talking.  We worked together years and years ago and his comedy group Hoosier Daddy was kind of the inspiration for me forming the Desperate Houseguys.  Brad had a rental car and offered to drive me to the Riviera for my lunch appointment.

I called Carl when I got there to let him know I was downstairs.  Minutes later he burst out of the elevator as upbeat and cheerful as ever.  We took off for lunch, and without giving any details in where or how he did it, Carl managed to scam both of us free meals.

If you’re not a huge comedy nerd, then you may not know that along with Sam Kinison, was one of the founding members of the Outlaws of Comedy.  Carl was Sam’s best friend and they worked together through Sam’s entire, albeit short lived, career.  Carl has seen it all.  He was there in Los Angeles during the comedy boom.   This morning, the wild man who partied with rock stars and porn legends was working a grift to  get us breaded fish and mac & cheese!  For dessert, stolen ice cream!

During lunch I brought Carl up to speed on where I was personally.  It always seems like when things are going well professionally, they’re hurting personally.  When they’re going well personally, professionally they’re suffering.  This was one of those times where both personally and professionally things weren’t going well at all.  I was down and I needed my happy sage to pick me up.

We went back up to his hotel room before his show and he opened his iTunes.  He started playing me song after song and telling me the story of how he found the song and what it meant to him.  Those songs spoke to me at that moment and speak to me now as the best memory of have of Las Vegas.  Here are a couple of them.

I sat there listening to the lyrics of about a half a dozen songs and felt like they were written just for me.  I knew I was experiencing a profound and beautiful moment that would last with me for the rest of my life and I had the foresight to know and appreciate that.  It was a perfect moment.  I tried to fight back the tears.  Carl took a break from getting ready for his show and sat down next to me smiling and seemingly pleased that this moment he orchestrated didn’t fall on deaf ears.

We jumped on Youtube and he showed me a couple things he was working on.  We talked about great guitar players and shared our love of music.  He shared with me some of his guitar playing.  This is a song he wrote about his life.  I love it a lot.  I hope he records it…or someone helps me lift the audio from this so I can put it on my iPod.  Even through the turbulent moments of this song, I feel a peaceful and soothing rhythm.  The song has momentum and makes me feel like things are going to move forward no matter what you do about it.  Check out Carl’s playing.

I’m in Vegas now.   I’m not having any profound moments, but things are moving forward no matter what I do about it.  And that’s okay.

Tales From the Script: Part 3 (Tools of the Trade)

The first few things I wrote years ago were done with a regular old word processor.  It was a pain in the ass.  Every time I went to do a new draft, I’d have to manual go in and change the “continued” and all that stuff.  Setting the tabs was awful.  Making sure everything was formatted correctly caused me so much panic.

I was never able to full jump into just the creative part of screenwriting because the mechanics were always in the back of my mind.  Well, truthfully, they were front and center.

A year or so ago I got Final Draft.  It’s the industry standard for screenwriting and I totally see why.  It’s basically a word processor program specifically designed to write scripts.  I don’t have to think about anything other than the story when I use it.  When you hit Enter to go on to a next section, it asks you if you want this to start with a character, dialogue, scene header, whatever.  With a click, you can be back on track.  It becomes second nature and it makes the whole process so much quicker and easier.

Here’s something else I just found out about Final Draft.  Okay, I mentioned before that Lesley and I are going to start on a spec script to show that we can write television as well.  I Googled Modern Family scripts and found a link to a template that plugs right into Final Draft!  There are plug ins for pretty much every popular show out there.  And if you’re writing a spec script, the best idea is to do it for a popular show.  As much as I loved The Middleman, writing a script for that would make little to no sense!

Yes, the software is a little expensive, but if you’re serious about writing, I can not recommend it enough.  Here’s a link if you want more information.

Tales From the Script: Part 2 (Storytime)

In our last episode, after a few attempts at screenwriting, I found a great writing partner in Lesley Braden.

Lesley’s idea (and the script is already registered with the WGA so just try and steal it, buster) was about a woman in her mid to late 30s who was tired of people either harassing her or taking advantage of her time because she was single.  She creates a fake guy on Facebook and puts herself in a relationship with said guy.  It’s Bridesmaids meets The Social Network.  Both movies just came out.  Both movies were successful.  Kristen Wiig changed Hollywood overnight and showed the women can open a comedy and make a ton of money.  Lesley’s idea was original, fun and hugely marketable.  I was hooked!

Initially we started writing it with the two of us in mind to play the lead character and her slacker roommate.  I have friends who have production companies in Michigan, so it seemed like something we could potentially try to raise money and make.  As it went on, we realized how this script would be a really great calling card for us if we wanted to try to get writing jobs.  So we stopped limiting ourselves with set pieces that we could possibly pull off if we were to raise enough money through a Kickstarter campaign of whatever and we decided to shoot for the stars.

When we cracked the story, we didn’t do a traditional outline.  We knew key comedy moments that we wanted to happen and then from there we figured out how to get there.  Using a basic three act structure, we knew too when certain beats had to happen.    As we fleshed out the secondary characters more, our secondary story lines and conflicts started to become clearer too.  We were both on the same page that we didn’t want this to necessarily be a joke based comedy.  We wanted the humor to come from the characters.  We both do comedy though, so naturally the jokes found their way into it.

The crazy thing was that every idea either of us had, the other either found a way to build on it or tweak it into something different.  We never pitched a story element to have the other one say, “That’s the dumbest thing I ever heard”.  I think that’s the key to a strong writing partnership.  You can’t shoot down someone else’s idea without anything of your own to add.   I’m sure it helps that from the beginning we were both really on the same page.

Okay, I’m going to jump ahead in time to the present day.  We’re going to start working on a spec script for a television show.  It’s an idea that I had rattling in my brain for awhile.  I bounced it off of Lesley the other night and instead of shooting down my idea, she said, “That’s great, we could do that or maybe make it this slightly different thing too.”  Okay, that’s not technically a quote, but you know what I mean.  While her idea was slightly different than mine, it also opened itself up for a neat spin on the ideas I already had.  I think the most exciting part of writing a story is not knowing what’s going to happen next.  Changing a small detail, or even a large one, can definitely do that!  I’m looking forward to cracking another story with her.

Tales from the Script: Part 1 (Partnering Up)

I’m at a pivotal point in the screenwriting process.  I thought for my own piece of mind I’d share the journey it took to get here.  I don’t know where this story will end.  I certainly hope it has a happy ending.  Let’s start from the beginning.

I’ve written a lot of screenplays.  Most of them were through my twenties.  I burned all my bridges in radio and television, moved back to Michigan and had the first “real” job of my life working in a Toys R Us.  Over the next few years I went through my Kevin Smith phase.  I first wrote my “Clerks” about a guy who was working in a big box toy store cleverly called We B Toys.

Next when I was in an unhappy relationship and feeling like I was hundreds of miles from where I wanted to be, I wrote my “Dogma” about a couple in an unhappy relationship who die and get stuck in Purgatory…which happens to be a small town in the middle of nowhere.

After that, the unhappy relationship ended so I wrote my “Chasing Amy” about a guy who ends his unhappy relationship and starts a non-romantic relationship.  I guess it was also my “When Harry Met Sally”.  The main character in that one was a struggling stand up comedian.  At the time, I hadn’t stepped foot on the comedy stage yet, so it was just a way for me to get out the material I wrote without having to actually perform it.  Coincidentally, the arc of that character kind of mirrored what I ended up doing creatively in real life years later.

So, after those first few attempts at screenwriting I started doing stand up and seemed to have a knack for it.  Most of my creative juices flowed into that outlet.  Friends asked me if I wanted to partner up with them on scripts, but for one reason or another it never really worked out.

Last year a fellow performer named Lesley Braden and I met with some other performers about starting a sketch comedy group.  That didn’t work out, but Lesley and I found that we worked really well together.  She pitched me her idea for the story we ended up writing and I loved it.   It’s like what they say about love.  You find it when you’re not looking for it.  I wasn’t looking for the perfect screenwriting partner, I just happened upon her!

Next time, I’ll talk about the story.

Tips For Comedians: Connected Comedy

There’s an old saying about how the reason BUSINESS is eight letter and SHOW is only four is because two third of SHOW BUSINESS is BUSINESS.   I recently signed up for a thing called Connected Comedy.   A few times a week I get emails from Josh Spector giving comedians tips on the business side of comedy.  It’s hugely helpful to me since that’s an area I’ve always been lacking.  I save those e-mails as new and when I have a little bit of free time I look at some of the tips to see what I can incorporate into what I’m already doing. It’s an incredibly valuable resource that I urge all comedians to sign up for.  I wanted to know more about how it began, so I shot Josh some questions.  Here’s what he had to say.  I hope you enjoy.

What made you decide to start Connected Comedy?

Besides being passionate about comedy, marketing, business, and technology, there’s really two main reasons why I started Connected Comedy.

First, I felt like I had accumulated a good amount of knowledge about the comedy business and in particular how to promote comedy content and grow a fanbase using digital tools. I looked around and while I saw tons of resources for comedians to learn how to perform stand up, sketch, or improv, I didn’t really see any that were teach comedians how to build a fanbase and grow their career. I thought that was something I could do.

The second reason I started Connected Comedy was because I saw it as an opportunity to try out much of what I thought I had learned and see if I could implement these same strategies to grow my own fanbase and launch a business. While I’m not (and never have been) a comedian, I think that most of what you do to attract an audience and then eventually monetize that audience by providing value is the same no matter what specifically you’re trying to pursue. Connected Comedy has given me (and continues to give me) a great opportunity to learn hands-on what works and what doesn’t when it comes to using social media to build a business.

Have there been tips from other artists that made you slap yourself on the forehead and say, “Why didn’t I think of that?”

There’s been lots of little things I’ve seen people do that I recognize as good ideas, but the truly big stuff that has influenced me typically has come more from marketing and business experts. Specifically, author Seth Godin has been a huge influence on me and in particular his book “Tribes,” which I recommend every comedian read at some point.

What’s the one thing you notice comedians not doing that they really should be doing?

I think there’s two things that comedians should be doing more of. First, the vast majority of comedians still don’t seem to understand that the future of their career is really now in their own hands. I see way too much waiting around for a break, to get discovered, or for somebody else to give them permission to have a career.

Comedians obsession with bookers, clubs, agents/managers, and festivals are all ways to avoid facing the fact that you can now create your own opportunities. Not enough comedians realize that.

The second thing I don’t see enough comedians doing is really pouring a lot of time and effort into creating content online. Whether that’s videos, a podcast, a blog, or something else, comedians now have the opportunity to reach the entire world at virtually no cost yet most of them can’t even get it together to build a respectable website (which doesn’t even have to cost any money!). Comics will obsess over getting more stage time in front of 20 people, yet will ignore the millions they could be reaching online. I don’t get it.

Patton Oswalt spoke at the Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal about how we, as artists, don’t necessarily need “gate keepers” anymore to open doors for ourselves because we have the technology to reach everyone.    How do you see the future of comedy and the arts?

I agree with everything Patton said and it’s been really interesting in just the past couple years since I started Connected Comedy to see how big name comics are starting to capitalize on the opportunities I’ve been trying to preach since I started. I’m certainly not taking credit for it, but hopefully as more people like Patton and Louis CK are out there talking about how the business has changed and showing younger comics what is possible, the message will start to be better understood.

I don’t think that Hollywood is going away any time soon and there will always be clubs, festivals, and a comedy “industry.” However, the balance of power is about to shift dramatically to the individual comedians and away from the gatekeepers. And the comedians who understand how to work in that new world order are the ones that will succeed.

Just look at the music industry – the same thing has happened there as the labels don’t have anywhere near the power they once had and the only new artists that can succeed are the ones that understand how to build their own fanbase.

Thank you so much for Josh for taking the time to answer those.  Please check out Connected Comedy where you can sign up for the newsletter, read a ton of helpful articles, listen to the podcast and even sign up for classes.

Way to go, Clubs!

In the past nine and a half years I’ve performed in a lot of clubs and a bunch of them stand out for one reason or another because they do something so incredibly right.  I just wanted to point a few of them out and apologize preemptively for any of the ones I forgot.  When I write these, I type as I think and don’t even really go back to proof them unless a word gets underline in red!  These are my thoughts as I have them.  I guess what I’m saying is please book me again even if you slipped my mind this morning.  Please…

The Skyline in Appleton, Wisconsin doesn’t do a check drop.  If you’re not a comedian you might not know what that means.  If you are a comedian you haven’t closed a show yet, you might not even know what this is a big deal.  The check drop is when the waitstaff drops the bills off at the tables.  In a restaurant it’s not a big deal because everyone comes and goes at different times.  Being a wait person at a comedy club seems like one of the most difficult jobs in the world.  Every single person is arriving at almost the same time and every single person is leaving at the exact same time!  When you’re on stage, you go from being the focus of everyone in the room to losing everyone in the room at the exact same moment.  At each table someone is fiddling for money.  It can be very distracting.  A lot of clubs do it really well.  The club that does is the best is The Skyline because they don’t do it at all.  I’m not exactly sure what they do, but it has something to do with table numbers.  When the audience leaves, they tell the cashier on the way out which table they were at and then the settle their bill then.  It’s fast and efficient.  While they have their money in their hands and are in spending mode, they next walk past the comedians selling their merchandise.

During slow times a lot of clubs will “paper the room”.  What that means is they give out free passes to get butts in seats.  Clubs make most of their money off of drink sales, so it’s not usually a huge deal.  Sometimes it sucks for the performer because if people haven’t invested anything financially into a show, they sometimes forget to invest their attention.  The two clubs that stand out for me with papering are Lansing Connxtions and Dr. Grin’s.  Lansing runs silly contests on their Facebook page.  A lot of times the contests will coincide with the comedians that are there.  The week I was headlining, the theme for the contests was nerdy movie trivia.  This is great for a couple reasons.  First is I’m getting to perform in front of people who share my interests.  That’s going to make for a better experience both for me and them.  My first show that week there was a woman front and center with a Futurama t-shirt on.  I couldn’t have been happier!    She’s going to have friends who she’s going to tell about the show and next time I’m there, maybe she’s back with an even larger group.  I win and so does the club!  The second reason is because people still feel like they “earned” a show even if they didn’t invest money in it.  I think it makes the audience more engaged.

When I started,  Dr. Grin’s in Grand Rapids had a house emcee who used the moniker Dr. Billy Grin.   Billy kept a stack of free passes with him everywhere he went and he passed them out to beautiful women all around town.  When people asked where all the hot chicks in Grand Rapids hung out, people would tell them, “Dr. Grin’s.”   They were packed almost all the time!  And Grin’s is the perfect experience for this because it’s in The B.O.B. with a bunch of other bars.  It was one stop mating game…or whatever the kids call it.

Some clubs have staffs that honestly seem like they hate comedy.   The Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase is just the opposite.  They love comedy there!  This is great for both Roger who runs the place and the comedians.  Roger has a fleet of people recommending  people for him to bring in.  It’s great for us too because if you can make that staff laugh, particularly Jay behind the bar, then you know you’re doing something right.  It’s a great way to test material on something other than your cats…who will never laugh because that’s physically impossible for cats to do.  If you look at the line up at any time on the calendar at that club you’re going to see people who are on the verge of breaking big or are currently the secret gem that only people in the know know about.  Roger was booking Lynne Koplitz way before she was doing television with Joan Rivers.  Roger was booking Jackie Kashian years before everyone in LA had a podcast and found a way to mention that Jackie is one of the best out there.  You can see the best of the best at Ann Arbor and be like the cool kid who can say the comedy equivalent of, “I saw Green Day at St. Andrews.”  By the way, I did see Green Day at St. Andrews.

Reach out to the community.  Joey’s Comedy Club is open more days a week than most comedy clubs in the world.  That’s largely due to the fact that Bill Bushart who runs the place does Comedy For A Cause better than anyone I’ve ever met.  Being a comedian himself, Bill knows how much better it is to perform for a full house.  Since I’ve known him he’s been working at Joey’s doing promotions.  Probably a week doesn’t go by where there isn’t some sort of fundraiser going on at Joey’s.  Those fundraisers fill the place.  It’s great too because then it becomes someone else’s job to fill the seats and not the clubs.  If there’s a group that wants to do a fundraiser first show Saturday, then the club is now freed up to focus on second show Saturday.  Both shows benefit!  When the fundraisers go well, there’s invariably someone in the audience that thinks, “damn, this was a fun way to raise money.  I should do one of these too.”  They get in touch with Bill and another one is booked.  Comedy For a Cause is so successful at Joey’s that many times they end up having to do a third show on Saturdays!  I’ve been to clubs where they’ve had to cancel a second show on a Saturday because of lack of audience.  Joey’s is open six days a week and has at least eight shows every week.

Posters, posters, posters.  The Comedy Club on State in Madison, Wisconsin has a great graphic artist who makes posters for every show.  The posters are beautiful and are hung prominently on the street in a great location.   The Comedy Castle in Royal Oak has great posters inside as well that are also works of art.  I was just at Laugh Comedy Club in Bloomington.  It’s a smaller club on a limited budget.  Adam that runs the place is hyper aware of how much of a difference a good poster can make.  The person that was designing them used a text heavy design.  Adam told him that he really wanted logos of the credits each comedian had.  Now you get great posters there that really stand out.  Bloomington, like Madison has a lot of foot traffic and those posters hang right on the street where people passing by can see them.  They jump out at you too and generate buzz.  A good poster can make a huge difference.

A nice green room is heaven!  The Ice House in Pasadena has nice comfortable seating in there.  We had a tray of cheese and crackers. If my memory is correct, there were beverages too.   The Comedy Castle has a little fridge that always has water for the comedians.  The lighting in there is perfect.  There’s a television in both clubs where you can watch the show.  The Castle even has it where you can tape yourself right from the green room via a ceiling mounted camera pointed at the stage!

And finally, say, “Thank You”.  I absolutely love The Comedy Club on State in Madison, Wisconsin and always will because my last memory of the place every time I leave is an amazing one.  When they pay you, they pay you in an envelope with a Thank You card.  I still have my cards from every time I’ve been there.  They write you a note and the management staff all signs it.  It’s a small gesture, but it’s one that makes me happy every time I think about it.   When a club makes an effort like that to show that they appreciate you, it makes you want to do everything you can to let them know you appreciate them as well.  Whenever I’m on stage I want to do my best, but when I’m on stage in Madison I want to do better than my best.

So thank you to these, and all the clubs that have been keeping me steadily employed all these years!

Remembering Angel

Friday I lost someone very dear to me.

Things have changed drastically lately. Through divorce I lost half my family. My former sister-in-law Angel was the only person I really kept in contact with.

Angel was always a huge supporter of comedy. She moved to Chicago a long time ago to pursue an art career and fell in love with the Chicago comedy scene. She was there during a time when all the cool Chicago comics who comedy nerds know so well were just starting off and finding their voices. Angel was an amazing illustrator who had a keen knack for capturing the energy and buzz of a setting in a static image. Of all her work my favorites were always those of live performances of open mic shows where you could just feel the excitement in the room of people trying and seeing new things for the first time.

My favorite art has always been the kind that was deeply personal. Angel had Lupus and wrote and illustrated a graphic novel depicting her double hip and double knee replacement surgeries and how liberating it was afterwards when she was finally able to ride a bike again and do other things people her age were able to do. Mind you, these surgeries all took place while she was just in her twenties.

For a person who dealt daily with an immobilizing disease Angel made the most of her unfortunately short life.

I have many favorite memories of her. She really was like a little sister to me. She ended up moving back to Michigan for various reasons. While it’s feasible not to know how to drive in Chicago, that’s really not an option in the metro Detroit area where everything is so spread out. I took her to take her driving test and get her license. Notoriously a person who refused to smile in pictures, I managed to make her crack while they took her driver’s license picture. It was my proudest moment with her. That moment replaced my earlier proudest moment when her best friend Kristy let it slip that Angel liked my comedy. Like a typical big brother/little sister relationship, we’d torment each other constantly! The highest compliment we’d pay to each other’s face would be something along the lines of, “you don’t smell too bad today.”

Angel’s services and funeral are this week. I don’t know if I’m going to go. It’s not entirely even because I don’t think her family wants me there. I feel like I already had my goodbye and I don’t want to lose that memory.

Last Monday, five days before Angel passed was my birthday. She sent me a text saying that she really missed comedy a lot and wanted to come out to the open mic I was doing. I told her she should. She was worried about making people uncomfortable and I assured her that it didn’t matter and I’d like to see her again. She came out, we watched the show and jokes back and forth. Maybe it was nothing other than the joy of being around a thing she enjoyed so much that overwhelmed her, but when we parted ways that night she gave me a hug. The only physical interaction we ever really had before that was secretly giving each other the middle finger when no one was looking. She gave me a hug though and said, “Ooh, I hugged you.” I told her it was okay because she didn’t smell too bad. Then we went out separate ways. That’s the goodbye I want to remember forever. I loved that girl.

Angel, Kristy and me at the Royal Oak Music Theatre during the Laugh Detroit Comedy Festival.

9th Anniversary and my thoughts on comedy classes

Nine years ago today I had my graduation show at Joey’s Comedy Club.  Since then I’ve done over 1480 shows.

Some comedians argue about the benefits of comedy classes.  I like them, but with an asterisk.

I don’t believe you can teach someone to be funny.  I think it’s like playing a musical instrument.  You either have an ear for music or you don’t.  It’s the same way with comedy.  Either you have an ear for what a joke sounds like or you don’t.  Yeah, like with music, you can teach the mechanics, but some people just are never going to get it.  They don’t have that natural ability.

Believe me, I wanted to play bass so badly.  Practically all my friends when I was a teenager and in my early twenties were great musicians.  A lot of my friends to this day are still great musicians.  I just don’t have a natural affinity towards music.  I practiced and practiced my bass until I was passable in a punk band where I wrote most of the songs so I knew I didn’t throw anything out there that was beyond my ability.  My first passion is music.  If I could do that, I would.  I hate that I can’t.  I took guitar lessons and tried, but at the end of the day someone else with a natural ability was going to have a much easier time and go a lot further.

It’s the same way with comedy classes.  Some people take the classes with no ability, but they want to be a comedian so bad.  They’ll never really figure it out.  Some people have that ability and just need little pushes in the right direction.  Some people may be amazing writers and just want to conquer their fear of public speaking.  For that matter, some people may have no interest in comedy at all and only want to conquer their fear of public speaking.

I believe comedy classes are a good thing…as long as their being taught by a comedian.  There was, for a time, a stand up class being taught by a local actor.  I guess that class was for students who wanted to learn how to act like a comedian.

Bill Bushart taught my class.  Bill himself is a great comedian, but what makes him an even better teacher is his ability to almost immediately tap into a student’s sensibility and punch up the material in their voice.  Bill is a master of tagging jokes and in my opinion the best teacher out there.  I don’t know how things would’ve been different for me had he not been my instructor.

I’m glad I took comedy classes and started this pursuit of this craft.  I’ve never worked hard for anything in my life before this.  Everything I did, I did because it came easy to me.  I’ve sacrificed more for comedy than anything else or anyone else in my life.  I don’t know that I’ve made the right decisions always.  At times I’m almost certain I’ve made the exact wrong decisions.  Comedy has given to me and it’s taken from me.  I’m so deep in it now that I don’t see a life without it.  I love comedy like a junky loves their fix.  At moments of lucidity I see comedy as the Symbiote that at first helped Peter Paker and then later tried to destroy him.  But when I’m on stage, I’m high and I like it there.

Looking back, if I were to give anyone advice starting out, it would be to set boundaries.  Look at the things that make you happy now and never let comedy step on those things or take those things away from you.  When you sit down with a note book to write new bits, write yourself reminders about where you are and what’s important.  My personal experience is it’s hard to balance the life of a comedian with the real world.  I think the people who have are the people whose real world really started once they reached a certain level of success.  I don’t know.

All I’ve learned in the past nine years is that I’ve amassed a lot of opinions about things and an ability to spew them without having any real knowledge of anything at all.  And that’s what comedy is really…when you break it down.  One person in the spotlight spreading their thoughts to a somewhat captive audience.

Well…this return to the website took a weird twist, eh?  Welcome back.

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